Extreme Heat

Arizona is known for its extreme temperatures from May through October. It is important to know how to be prepared for extreme heat. Stay hydrated, stay indoors, seek shade, take frequent breaks, and do any necessary outdoor activities in the early morning hours. Source: National Weather Service - Phoenix

Extreme Heat - Ready.gov

There is hot, and then there is hot!

Extreme heat is a period of high heat and humidity with temperatures above 90 degrees for at least two to three days. In extreme heat your body works extra hard to maintain a normal temperature, which can lead to death. Extreme heat is responsible for the highest number of annual deaths among all weather-related hazards.

Older adults, children and sick or overweight individuals are at greater risk from extreme heat.

This guide is an excellent introduction to the topic of extreme heat. Excellent links to other extreme heat related information for further investigation.

Preparing for Extreme Heat

There is hot, and then there is hot!

Extreme heat is a period of high heat and humidity with temperatures above 90 degrees for at least two to three days. In extreme heat your body works extra hard to maintain a normal temperature, which can lead to death. Extreme heat is responsible for the highest number of annual deaths among all weather-related hazards.

Older adults, children and sick or overweight individuals are at greater risk from extreme heat.

Attachments
  • Red Cross - Extreme Heat ChecklistPDF
  • FEMA - Be Prepared for Extreme HeatPDF

Essential Technology to Have During Natural Disasters

"Free apps and affordable gadgets can help before and after extreme weather."

"Given the frequency and intensity of natural disasters these days, chances are it’s a case of when — not if — extreme weather will affect your life.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) says emergency preparedness is critical to help protect your family, your home and your belongings from a myriad of threats, such as wildfires, drought, floods, hurricanes and tornadoes."

“We encourage everyone to be prepared year-round for any disaster, hazard or climate event,” says Jaclyn Rothenberg, FEMA’s director of public affairs. “Know what disasters and hazards could affect your area, how to get emergency alerts and where to go if you and your family need to evacuate.” Rothenberg says this requires having an evacuation plan and practicing it often.

"Technology can play an essential role in emergency preparedness with helpful apps and gadgets to get you through a natural disaster."

For more information, check the website for this 2022 article from AARP.

Prevent Hot Car Deaths

Check the Back Seat

Over the past 25 years, more than 940 children have died of heatstroke, because they were left or became trapped in a hot car. It’s important for everyone to understand that children are more vulnerable to heatstroke and that all hot car deaths are preventable.

Know the Facts:

A child's body temperature rises three to five times faster than an adult's.

When a child is left in a vehicle, that child's temperature can rise quickly — and the situation can quickly become dangerous.

Heatstroke begins when the core body temperature reaches about 104 degrees.

A child can die when their body temperature reaches 107 degrees.

In 2022, 33 children died of heatstroke in vehicles.

In 2018 and 2019, we saw a record number of hot car deaths - 53 children died each year — the most in at least 25 years, according to NoHeatstroke.org.

American Red Cross - Extreme Heat Preparedness Checklist

Extreme Heat Safety

"Learn how to stay safe during a heat wave and how to treat heat-related illness like heat exhaustion."

An extreme heat event is a series of hot days, much hotter than average for a particular time and place. Extreme heat is deadly and kills more people than any other weather event. Climate change is making extreme heat events more frequent, more severe, and last longer. But we can take action to prepare. Prepare now to protect yourself and your loved ones."

For more information check the website.

How to Keep Your Dog Cool in the Summer Heat

7 strategies to prevent your pet from overheating

"In some places this summer, going outside can feel like walking into an oven turned up to broil. And if humans feel that way as they venture out, furry pets feel it more."

This July 2022 article from AARP does strategies to help keep your pet cool in extreme summer heat.

"Dogs cool themselves by panting. But panting becomes inefficient in extreme heat, during physical exertion, when a dog is dehydrated, when there’s insufficient ventilation or due to a combination of those factors.​

​Within minutes, a dog can become overheated, which can lead to heat exhaustion, heatstroke, kidney failure, brain damage and even death, veterinarians say."

National Weather Service - Phoenix Heat Page

Most every statistic, record or fact that you might want to know regarding heat from the National Weather Service!

Heat is the #1 Weather-Related Killer in Arizona!

Heat Safety Tips:

. Drink water: Stay hydrated
. Dress for heat: Wear light-weight layers
. Use sunscreen: Use SPF 30 or greater
. "Look before you lock": Never leave children or pets in cars.
. Keep cool: Take breaks in shade or in areas with A/C

Notes

Arizona Heat Facts:

The highest temperature recorded in Arizona was 128 degrees F in Lake Havasu on June 29, 1994.

The highest temperature recorded in Phoenix was 122 degrees F on June 26,1990. The Phoenix Sky Harbor airport was forced to shut down for several hours.

The highest temperature recorded in Yuma was 124 degrees F on July28, 1995.

Hydration & Heat Relief in Pinal County - Summer 2023

"There are many locations throughout the County where you can cool off in the air conditioning or get water.

Click on a red pin below for location, hours of operation, and contact information for each site."

Check out this site for cooling station locations.

Also, remember to keep an eye on vulnerable family and friends. Should their HVAC system breakdown or fail to keep up with the heat they have an emergency situation. Find a way to move the affected person(s) to cool place and then call for a repair person.

If there is a need for financial assistance, try reaching out to home repair programs. CAHRA has a Minor Home Repair Program that might be of some assistance. For CAHRA programs, income limits will likely apply.

If the affected person lives in Maricopa County, there may be assistance available from the county.

CR's Ultimate Heat Survival Guide

"With temperatures rising, we’ve gathered the best ways to stay comfortable and safe—both inside and out—even on scorching hot days."

A July 10th, 2023, survival guide from Consumer's Report. Check it out!

7 Ways to Stay Cool on the Cheap

Beat excessive heat without breaking the bank.

"For budget-conscious older adults, blasting the air conditioner all day and stocking up on an endless supply of bottled water may not be ideal, but there are other ways to stay cool without breaking the bank, including these seven."

A July 2023 article from AARP with some inexpensive options to stay cool in extreme heat.

Older Adult Toolkit: Extreme Heat - Stay Safe When Our State Heats Up

Heat Safety - Older Adult Toolkit

Heat illness is a preventable condition, but has been the number one weather-related cause of death in the United States. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), heat illness causes more deaths than hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods, and earthquakes combined. From 2009 to 2019, over 2,000 deaths were caused from exposure to excessive natural heat. Of deaths among Arizona residents, 34 percent occurred in older adults over the age of 65. The Heat and Older Adults Safety Toolkit (HOAST) was created to provide older adults and caregivers information to stay safe in the heat.

An informative article from the Arizona Department of Health Services

Pet Heat Safety

Tips to Keep Your Pets Safe During Summer


The following tips are provided by The Humane Society of the United States:

. Never leave your pet in the car.

In nice weather you may be tempted to take your pet with you in the car while you travel or do errands. But during warm weather, the inside of your car can reach 120 degrees in a matter of minutes, even if you're parked in the shade. This can mean real trouble for your companion animals left in the car.

If you do happen to see a pet alone in a car during hot weather, alert the management of the store where the car is parked. If the owner does not return promptly, call local animal control or the police department immediately.

. Don't put your pet in the back of a truck.


It is very dangerous, and in some states illegal, to drive with a dog in the back of a pick-up truck. Not only can flying debris cause serious injury, but a dog may be unintentionally thrown into traffic if the driver suddenly hits the brakes, swerves or is hit by another car. Dogs should ride either in the cab (in a crate or wearing a seat belt harness designed for dogs) or in a secured crate in the bed of the truck.

. Watch out for fertilizers and deadly plants.


Plant food, fertilizer and insecticides can be fatal if your pet ingests them. In addition, more than 700 plants can produce physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals.

. Provide plenty of fresh water.


To avoid pet heat exhaustion, make sure your pets have access to cool, fresh water all day long.

. Stay bite-free.


With people and dogs spending more time outside, dog bites are likely to increase in the warmer months. Spaying or neutering your dog reduces the likelihood that he will bite and provides many other health benefits.

. Keep your pets safe and healthy year-round.

Make sure your pet is always wearing a collar and identification tag. If you are separated from your pet, an ID tag may very well be his or her ticket home.

. Check with your veterinarian to see if your pets should be taking heartworm prevention medication.

Heartworm disease, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, can be fatal in both dogs and cats.

. Another warm weather threat is fleas and ticks.

Use only flea and tick treatments recommended by your veterinarian. Some over-the-counter flea and tick products can be toxic, even when used according to instructions.

Extreme Heat - Heat Related Illnesses

Heat Safety - Heat-Related Illness

Arizona typically experiences lengthy high temperatures during the summer months. Frequent triple digit temperatures which typically last from May to September can increase a person's risk for a heat-related illness. Nearly 3,000 people visit Arizona emergency rooms because of heat-related illnesses annually. Some heat-related illnesses can even be fatal. Over 2,000 people have died from excessive exposure to heat from 2011-2021.

As a result, the Arizona Department of Health Services has developed a Heat Emergency Response Plan, a Heat Safety Resource Guide, and a bilingual Heat Brochure.

This is another informative article from the Arizona Department of Health Services regarding heat related illness.

Keep Pets Safe in the Heat

How to keep animals cool when temperatures soar.

"The summer months can be uncomfortable—even dangerous—for pets and people. It's difficult enough simply to cope with rising temperatures, let alone thick humidity, but things really get tough in areas that are hit with the double blow of intense heat and storm-caused power outages, sometimes with tragic results.

We can help you keep your pets safe and cool this summer. Follow our tips for helping everyone in your family stay healthy while hot."

This article from the Humane Society of the United States provides excellent hot weather advice for the safety of your pets.

Extreme Weather and Public Health - Arizona Department of Health Services

Heat Safety - Heat-Related Illness

"Arizona typically experiences lengthy high temperatures during the summer months. Frequent triple digit temperatures which typically last from May to September can increase a person's risk for a heat-related illness. Nearly 3,000 people visit Arizona emergency rooms because of heat-related illnesses annually. Some heat-related illnesses can even be fatal. Over 2,000 people have died from excessive exposure to heat from 2011-2021."

Link to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

You Can Help Prevent Hot Car Deaths

About 40 children a year die from heatstroke, either because they were left or became trapped in a car. That's about one child every 10 days killed in a hot car.

940+ CHILD HOT CAR DEATHS SINCE 1998!

Child Safety -

Hot car deaths is the leading causes of non-crash-related fatalities among children. Learn more about keeping children safe in and around a car.

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